Frequently Asked Questions

Q: What is 4-H?

A: 4-H is the youth development program of Cooperative Extension for youth ages 5 to 18 that helps youth develop leadership, citizenship and life skills. It aims to assist youth in becoming competent, contributing citizens.

Q: I don’t live on a farm, how can I join 4-H?

A: All 4-H programs are open to any youth, regardless of membership in the 4-H program. Joining 4-H is as simple as completing the 4-H enrollment and 4-H medical release forms. 4-H has deep roots in agriculture, as it began with corn and tomato clubs in the early 1900s. Today in Utah, only 5 percent of youth live on farms.

Q: Isn’t 4-H just about cows and cooking?

A: While 4-H addresses these programs, the entire program is more diverse. Nationally, 4-H has three mission mandates: citizenship (civic engagement, service, civic education and leadership), healthy living (nutrition, fitness and social-emotional health), and science (animal science and agriculture, consumer science, engineering, environmental science and natural resources, life science and technology).

Q: What is the cost to join 4-H?

A: Annual 4-H membership is $10. Some workshops and activities will have fees associated with them to help cover the cost of materials.

Q: When does 4-H meet?

A: 4-H is active year round. Typically, 4-H clubs have monthly meetings. In addition, there are county, district and state level 4-H events, activities and competitions throughout the year.

Q: What is a 4-H club?

A: A 4-H club is an organized group of youth, supported by screened, adult volunteers. The club meeting consists of a business meeting which is led by the youth officers, program and social time.

Q: At what age can my child join 4-H?

A: Youth can join 4-H at age 5. A youth’s age for 4-H is determined by their age on Jan. 1 of the current year. You may continue to be a member of 4-H through age 18. Youth ages 5 to 8 years old are referred to as Cloverbuds. Cloverbuds are non-competitive, and receive participation ribbons in any activity they participate in.

Q: What does 4-H stand for?

A: The four H’s stand for Head, Heart, Hands and Health. Originally, there were only three H’s — Head, Heart and Hands. A fourth H, Hustle, was added in 1908. Hustle was changed to Health in 1911.

Q: As an adult, how can I become involved with 4-H?

A: 4-H is always looking for adult volunteers. There are many opportunities, depending on the amount of time you would like to donate. You can volunteer at a single event, such as a judge for our presentation contest or teaching a workshop. If you want a deeper level of involvement, you can become a 4-H club leader, which is a one year, renewable commitment.

For more information concerning 4-H opportunities, please contact us at 435-634-5706 or email paul.hill@usu.edu. For more information about 4-H or Utah State University Extension, call the Washington County Extension Office at 435-634-5706 or visit extension.usu.edu